who feels most strongly that they are citizens of their nations?

those individuals who feel most strongly that they are members of their local community.

at least there’s a strong positive correlation (0.85) between the presence of the two groups in a country.

from the world values survey 2005-2008 wave, below is a chart [click on chart for LARGER view] and a table giving the percentages of people in each nation who responded that they “strongly agree” with the following statements:

– (V211) I see myself as member of my local community
– (V212) I see myself as citizen of the [country] nation

wvs - member of local community - citizen of nation

here’s the table sorted by “Citizen of nation.” i can’t see any rhyme or reason for why some peoples feel more citizen-y than others. if you can see a pattern, lemme know! certainly having a lot of people in your country who strongly identify as citizens of that country does not appear to be enough to get you a well-functioning nation: ghana? mali? egypt? japan towards the bottom of the list? hmmmm.

wvs - member of local community - citizen of nation - table

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father’s brother’s daughter (fbd) marriage and honor killings

i took this table from the recent pew survey of muslims

honor killings permissible - pew 2013

…and made a couple of maps (adapted from this map).

the first one is a map of the differences between what percentage of muslims in each country responded that honor killing is never justifiable when a man commits an offense versus a woman committing an offense. a plus number (+) means more enthusiasm for honor killing women — a negative (-), men. here it is (click on image for LARGER view):

map of expansion of caliphate - pew honor killings diffs

what i think we can see is that, the closer you get to the arab expansion epicenter (the arab peninsula), the greater the enthusiasm for honor killing women. so in jordan it’s +47, lebanon and egypt +10, iraq +11. but when you get out to the edges of the caliphate, the differences are not so great, or they are in fact reversed: morocco -1, turkey and afghanistan and tajikistan 0. even pakistan is only +3. when you get way out to uzbekistan and kyrgyzstan, then the numbers are reversed: -14 and -3.

(it should be noted that for some reason the question was worded differently in uzbekistan, afghanistan, and iraq. everyone else was asked specifically about premarital sex/adultery and family honor, while the uzbekis, afghanis, and iraqis were only asked about family honor. see questions 53 and 54 here [pdf].)

i think that perhaps this is a reflection of what korotayev noticed, i.e. that father’s brother’s daughter (fbd) marriage is found in those places of the world that were a part of the eighth century muslim caliphate, because those populations wanted to emulate the arabs, and the arabs practiced fbd marriage. the reason that the populations on the edges of the caliphate are less enthusiastic about honor killing women is that they were arabized less and/or later than (dare i say it) the “core arabs” and so probably have been practicing fbd marriage for a shorter amount of time. (in fact, korotayev and other russian anthropologists suggest that fbd marriage started in the levant and moved southwards into the arab peninsula, so some of the jordanians and lebanese may have started practicing fbd marriage before the arabs down in the peninsula.)

i think, too, that there is a connection between fbd marriage and honor killings, because fbd marriage leads to greater inbreeding, and greater amounts of inbreeding may very probably lead to greater frequencies of “genes for altruism” — and honor killings can be viewed as a sort-of upside-down-and-backwards form of altruism (at least they seem that way to us).

and/or the arabs simply introduced some crazy “genes for upside-down-and-backwards altruism” to these various populations, and less so on the fringes presumably because not so many arabs actually made it that far. edit: also interesting to note is that in fbd societies, all of the men in extended families/clans share the same y-chromosome. if there is a connection between violence and some gene(s) on the y-chromosome (i thought greg cochran said something about this, but i can’t find it now), maybe this is exacerbated by fbd marriage.

here is the other map — the percentage of muslims in each country responding that it is rarely, sometimes, or often justified to honor kill women:

map of expansion of caliphate - pew honor killings women

again, the numbers taper off on the edges of the extent of the caliphate.

previously: father’s brother’s daughter’s marriage and inclusive inclusive fitness and who wants sharia?

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all tribes, all the time!

now that the msm — including cnn and the huffpost! — have caught up to hbd chick re. the importance of tribes in libya (~_^) …

In Libya, it’s all about the tribes“In Libya, the real power is in its tribal system.”

Libya’s tribal politics key to Gaddafi’s fate“[I]n Libya it is the much more opaque and complex tribal power structures that could decide how events play out.”

Navigating Libya’s tribal maze“Intricate tribal structure plays a crucial role in both Libyan politics and the current pro-democracy opposition.”

Libya’s Tribal Revolt May Mean Last Nail in Coffin for Qaddafi“Tribal loyalties form the bedrock of Libyan society.”

What’s With Libya? Who Are the Gaddafis?“The tribes and clans still play a silent but powerful role….”

Tribalism is key to the country’s future“‘It will be the tribal system that will hold the balance of power….'”

Libya tribes: Who’s who?“[T]he North African nation’s more than 140 tribes and clans … will likely determine the political future of Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi.”

… i thought i’d take a moment to reiterate the points i made about tribes and tribalism in north africa and the middle east.

the msm media has now figured out that tribes in libya (and, in case they hadn’t noticed, in places like afghanistan and iraq) have a lot of POLITICAL power, which some of them are now wielding in order to oust gaddafi.

in my post on tribes in libya, i was just repeating what kurtz|sailer| parapundit had pointed out about iraq several years ago now — that the existence of tribes in a place has SOCIAL repercussions.

i.e. because of the heavy inbreeding within the extended families|clans| tribes in libya (afghanistan, iraq, yemen, oman, egypt, etc…), the peoples of these places have divergent genetic interests and, therefore, do NOT get along. clans and tribes have been battling each other for centuries in these places. nepotism is rife in all of them — they favor their own ’cause they are MORE related to their relations than we are to ours. democracy in such societies doesn’t have a chance in hades.

THIS is the issue with tribes in these regions — the core reason why countries in north africa and the middle east are not going to develop into western-style democratic nations (not that there’s anything wrong with that!). not anytime soon, anyway.

“To enable one country to appreciate what another people really thinks and desires is both the most difficult and the most vital task which confronts us.” [John Bagot Glubb, Britain and the Arabs: A Study of Fifty Years 1908-1958.]

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