anglo-saxon burials and genetics in england

here’s a map (on the left) of anglo-saxon burial sites of the 5th to 7th centuries from “Anglo-Saxon immigration and ethnogenesis” compared to the distribution of the eastern, central, and southern english genetic cluster (red squares on map to right) from leslie et al. who found between 10-40% of the ancestry of those english to be anglo-saxon:

harcke - anglo-saxon burial sites 5th to 7th-8th centuries

that is all! (^_^)

previously: free cornwall now!

(note: comments do not require an email. anglo-saxon burial: lady and her cow.)

10 Comments

  1. Forgive me if I’ve said this before, but there’s a feature of Dark Ages and Middle Ages archaeology (and history) that I find odd. Whatever happened in Lancashire? Again and again there seems to be next-to-no data.

    Reply

  2. @dearieme – “Whatever happened in Lancashire?”

    i dunno! but now i’m craving a lancashire hotpot. (i’m hungry. need to eat! (*^_^*) )

    Reply

  3. Hmm that is quite a close match.

    However it also has considerable overlap with the territory of the British coin-minting tribes (pre-Roman):-

    I have no idea if that is significant or not but it sprung to mind.

    It also made me remember claims that Germanic languages may have already been spoken in certain regions of Britain before the Anglo-Saxon invasions (I think it was in Oppenheimer’s book a few years back, I must dig it out).

    I think hbd chick is a proponent of the population replacement hypothesis, which is perfectly ok ;-)

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  4. @chris – “…it also has considerable overlap with the territory of the British coin-minting tribes (pre-Roman)….”

    and that brings to my mind something that ed west tweeted this week: the lloegyr versus cymry peoples according to welsh tradition. hmmmm! (^_^)

    @chris – “I think hbd chick is a proponent of the population replacement hypothesis, which is perfectly ok ;-)”

    no, i’m not, really! no, i’ve bought what leslie et al. have found — the english appear to be 10-40% anglo-saxon, plus there’s 30% pre-roman “germanic” ancestry and this 40% “french” ancestry especially toward the south, and the rest appears to be briton roots — so, no, the english appear to be a mix. it wasn’t a population replacement by the anglo-saxons, and there does appear to have been some “germanic” in the base population before the anglo-saxons arrived. i would guess, tho, that the frequency of anglo-saxon — and pre-roman “germanic” (and “french”) — genes is greater in the southeast of england rather than in the northwest, say. closer to the continent.

    (^_^)

    Reply

  5. It was Oppenheimer’s view that the East Coast spoke Germanic. It makes sense; the sea was the highway not the land; the Anglo Saxons invented the horse collar so they moved onto the heavy soils with the open field system, not the “Celts”.

    The LBA borders of (Greater – River Severn) Wales, are marked by very large hillforts not seen elsewhere in Wales or England. An ethnic boundary even then?

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  6. “the lloegyr versus cymry peoples according to welsh tradition”

    “However it also has considerable overlap with the territory of the British coin-minting tribes (pre-Roman)”

    uplands vs lowlands again – seems to me like each wave of invaders took the prime spot, partly merging with and partly pushing back the previous wave.

    .

    “Whatever happened in Lancashire?”

    following the upland/lowland pattern the NW and NE lowlands were maybe taken slower than the south and center because the Pennines created an exposed flank – more so with the NW than the NE because moving into the NW from the midlands would have an exposed flank on both sides.

    Maybe even a bit of a no man’s land in some ways?

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  7. “i’m craving a lancashire hotpot.” One of our oddest culinary discoveries is how superior tripe in the Lancashire style is to Tripe a la Mode de Caen.

    if you google “Caen” and look at the wee map that appears, you’ll see that it has a SW suburb Bretteville-sur-Odon. So, a settlement of British emigrants in the Dark Ages. Is the Caen tripe Romano-Briton, and the Lancs tripe Anglo-Saxon? I think we should be told.

    Reply

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