who feels most strongly that they are citizens of their nations?

those individuals who feel most strongly that they are members of their local community.

at least there’s a strong positive correlation (0.85) between the presence of the two groups in a country.

from the world values survey 2005-2008 wave, below is a chart [click on chart for LARGER view] and a table giving the percentages of people in each nation who responded that they “strongly agree” with the following statements:

– (V211) I see myself as member of my local community
– (V212) I see myself as citizen of the [country] nation

wvs - member of local community - citizen of nation

here’s the table sorted by “Citizen of nation.” i can’t see any rhyme or reason for why some peoples feel more citizen-y than others. if you can see a pattern, lemme know! certainly having a lot of people in your country who strongly identify as citizens of that country does not appear to be enough to get you a well-functioning nation: ghana? mali? egypt? japan towards the bottom of the list? hmmmm.

wvs - member of local community - citizen of nation - table

(note: comments do not require an email. good citizen.)

Advertisements

14 Comments

  1. Maybe those are the wrong questions. If you had no food, could you go to other members of your community for help? Would you go help rebuild if there were a large fire in a city on the other side of the country?

    Japan kind of stands out, doesn’t it? Yet despite ranking so low in this poll, they hang together very well.

    “Citizen of a nation” may just mean you root for the national team.

    Reply

  2. Some of the largest gaps between the two are the Anglosphere and Scandinavia. But not all, so I would only read lightly into that.

    A quick hypothesis is that the former groups are founded on ideas and ideals, with tribal identification present, but moving to the background. There are nations with similar large gaps which don’t fit that explanation, however.

    Reply

  3. I can tell you a bit about Japan. They do have a communitarian spirit that’s linked to community when they’re in a rural community where everyone has long set roots. In urban and suburban areas, they’d more identify with their employer (not so much the company itself, but the people they work with and socialize with after work, since the two are linked). For young people it’s usually classroom group, or hobbyist group, and for retirees, often hobbyist group, or just hanging around with fellow company retirees.

    In general people are neighborly in the city, but not warm or open. I exchanged greetings with my apartment neighbor daily, but not once did he ever tell me his name or ask what mine was.

    As for the nation thing, Japanese are reticent to express any sort of overt nationalism at all, except when it really matters, like in regards to immigration or protection of national industries and art forms. Flag waving, talking about Dainippon, etc is weirdo behavior. Spending hours talking about how Japanese rice is superior to all other rice is not.

    Reply

  4. There are some patterns. On Citizen, all the 9 African nations are in the top 17. And there is similar but reversed (and less pronounced) pattern for Latin America.

    Reply

  5. You mean there is something that the Clan Theory of the Universe doesn’t explain?? I’m sure that can’t be the case. Perhaps a little more Internet-ing, pasting some hyperlinks to like-minded navel-gazers to “prove” your point, and I’m sure you will be able to “explain” the whole thing with cousin marriage and Grand Unified Clan Theory.

    Reply

  6. @anonymous – “You mean there is something that the Clan Theory of the Universe doesn’t explain??”

    nope! as i’ve already said many times, the inbreeding/outbreeding theory definitely does NOT explain everything.

    for instance, it probably doesn’t explain why some people troll around on the internet behaving generally like dickheads.

    the “Clan Theory of the Universe” and the “Grand Unified Clan Theory”?! i’m gonna use those! thanks!

    Reply

    1. @HBD Chick:
      “for instance, it probably doesn’t explain why some people troll around on the internet behaving generally like dickheads.”

      LOL! (I really did too). Well done!

      Reply

  7. I for one suspect that this is a bit of history in the making. Just the obvious connections between clannishness and organized crime – a huge global problem – gives this concept enough explanatory power to make it worthwhile pursuing. And that’s just one aspect of many.

    Reply

  8. – “Clan Theory of the Universe” and the “Grand Unified Clan Theory”?! i’m gonna use those! thanks!-

    ha,ha. – what next, film rights?

    yesterday i discovered that the Dark Enlightenment is not a reference to GOT (that’s Game of Thrones isn’t it?). I’m so out of touch!

    Reply

  9. @bnk – “ha, ha. – what next, film rights?”

    yes! first a trilogy — “The Clan Theory of the Universe,” “The Clan Theory of the Universe Strikes Back,” and “The Clan Theory of the Universe: Grand Unified Clan Theory.” then i can go back and do the prequels. (~_^)

    (that’ll be TCTotU, TCTotUSB, and TCTotU-GUCT, of course.)

    @bnk – “yesterday i discovered that the Dark Enlightenment is not a reference to GOT (that’s Game of Thrones isn’t it?). I’m so out of touch!”

    oh, man! you’ve definitely been missing out! (^_^) (see here, too.)

    Reply

  10. @spike – “Flag waving, talking about Dainippon, etc is weirdo behavior.”

    interesting! thanks for all your comments on the japanese there.

    do the japanese have a complex about wwii like the germans? a “don’t mention the war” thing?

    @spike – “Spending hours talking about how Japanese rice is superior to all other rice is not.”

    heh! (^_^) (and they’re right, too!)

    Reply

  11. @james the lesser – ” If you had no food, could you go to other members of your community for help? Would you go help rebuild if there were a large fire in a city on the other side of the country?”

    yeah. it would be really good to be able to get at that somehow.

    and we have seen real-life examples of difference in these areas, of course: japan post-earthquake/tsunami vs. all sorts of other places that don’t manage so well when natural disasters strike.

    i will always, always remember this one man interviewed on the news during some crisis in pakistan — there had been a terrible earthquake and it was winter and the authorities were having difficulties getting aid to remote, mountainous regions — and this man swore that when those government trucks finally arrived (if they ever would), he and his brothers would DESTROY those trucks!! so there! (yes — like THAT’S going to help! =/ )

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s