match made in heaven(?)

@the battle of kandahar in the 1880s, we’ve got the afghanis (the pashtuns?) vs. the 92nd (gordon highlanders) regiment of foot.

pashtuns vs. highlanders?! good lord.

kandahar: 92nd highlanders storming gundi mulla sahibdad:

Kandahar_92nd_Highlanders

(note: comments do not require an email. 92nd gordon highlanders at edinburgh castle, 1846.)

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4 Comments

  1. off topic:

    When derived breeds are bred together they trend is that they tend to look more like their common ancestor. This is because the derived breeds are distinctive due to homozygous recessive alleles that they express, and which are covered up in the hybrid. You could say that the distinctiveness of a phenotype is mostly based on the recessives that it expresses.

    Thus the X chromosome is, like the Y, a male chromosome. Only in the male does the X chromosome get to fully express itself. I came up with this theory after looking at my 23andme results and matching it up with my phenotype. Nearly all of my DNA is from one region, but my X is from a neighboring region. I (and some of my brothers) have a distinctive look related to the second region.

    Reply

  2. @t – “Thus the X chromosome is, like the Y, a male chromosome. Only in the male does the X chromosome get to fully express itself.”

    yes, that’s interesting. this is why some of the theories out there wrt autism — which seems to affect males more than females — posit that the “genes for autism” must be on the x-chromosome — because men have only the one. in women, it’s thought, any faulty genes on one of the x-chromosomes could be compensated for by the corresponding genes on the other x-chromosome.

    one thing that i thought of re. the x-chromosome and men (and their daughters) is that men pass on an unchanged x-chromosome to their daughters.

    men pass on a virtually unchanged (minus any mutations, of course) y-chromosome to their sons AND a virtually unchanged x-chromosome (minus any mutations) to their daughters. so i have pretty much the same x-chromosome as my dad. (^_^) the x-chromosome that i got from my mom is a shuffled up version of her two x-chromosomes.

    in one way, then, fathers and their children ought to be more alike one another than mothers and their children. no?

    @t – ” I (and some of my brothers) have a distinctive look related to the second region.”

    cool!

    edit: you and your brothers shouldn’t share an (almost) identical x-chromosome since your x-chromosomes would be shuffled up versions from your mother. otoh, you should all have near identical y-chromosomes! (^_^)

    Reply

  3. > the x-chromosome that i got from my mom is a shuffled up version of her two x-chromosomes.

    X-chromosome inactivation would add another layer of complexity to this story.

    “… half of the [human] female’s cells contain a working X chromosome from her father while the other half contain a working X chromosome from her mother (2). Therefore, X inactivation in females produces cellular mosaicism, which gives them a biological advantage.” BM Migeon, “Why Females Are Mosaics, X-Chromosome Inactivation,
    and Sex Differences in Disease,” 2007 (PDF).

    Reply

  4. @amac78 – “X-chromosome inactivation would add another layer of complexity to this story.”

    yes! absolutely. thanks for that pdf link! (^_^)

    Reply

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