vancouver

when i was reading about canada last week, i was surprised to learn that 30% of vancouver’s population is chinese. i mean, i knew that there was a lot of chinese folks in canada/british columbia, but i didn’t realize it was quite that many. (i know — where the h*ll have i been? well, obviously not in vancouver!)

which made me wonder: how civic are the chinese-vancouverans? so i checked the world values survey (couldn’t find any data by ethnic groups on statistics canada) for canada (2006) by region and ethnic group for the standard “civicness” questions.

couldn’t look at vancouver directly — just british columbia — although i think it’s a pretty safe assumption that most of the chinese in british columbia are in vancouver or some other urban area. unfortunately, the number of east asians (chinese+japanese) surveyed in british columbia was on the small side for each of the questions – n=32 or 33. *sigh* well, here are the results anyway — the percentages of those whites (n=210) and east asians in british columbia responding that they are active members of various types of voluntary organizations (click on chart for LARGER view):

east asians in british columbia appear to be less civic than whites in the province. the two groups score pretty closely on some of the questions — sport/recreation and art/music/eduction, for instance — but are worlds apart on others — charitable/humanitarian organization, church/religious, labor union, political party (0% for east asians).

still worried about the small sample size, i thought i’d check another province where a greater number of east asians were sampled. i found the sample size in ontario for east asians was n=49 to n=51 (depending on the question). for whites it was n=660-661. here’s what i got:

in ontario, east asians score more like whites in “civicness,” even surpassing them a LOT in being church goers. still lower on professional organization, labor unions and political party (0% again), but scoring higher than whites on all the other questions.

not sure why the numbers are different for east asians in ontario vs. british columbia. maybe it’s the sample size. maybe it’s because only 5% of the population of ontario is chinese/japanese versus 10.9% for british columbia, so east asians are more integrated in ontario? in terms of raw numbers, there are more chinese in ontario than british columbia: 576,975 vs. 407,225 (in 2006).

maybe it’s something else altogether. where in china the different groups came from perhaps? dunno.

previously: civic societies – where you can see the civicness scores for china, btw.

(note: comments do not require an email. oh, yeah: death to america!)

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9 Comments

  1. As well as any innate average base level i think rates of civicness are likely to vary in proportion to homogeneity.

    So (not literally) if say group A had a civic rating of 8 and group B 10 then in a situation where A/B were 10% and 90% respectively their actual civic ratings might be 0.8 and 9 whereas if the proportions changed to 60%/40% their ratings might change to be 4.8 and 4.

    I don’t think the effect will be linear (i think the least civic will be the most linear and vice versa) but i think this effect would fit Puttnam’s bowling alone research.

    Reply

  2. Richmond, a suburb of Vancouver, is almost all Chinese. I read on your blog a few days ago that people are stealing crops out of farmers’ fields at night in Richmond. People in Richmond don’t have to assimilate at all . They don’t have to speak English.

    About another third of greater Vancouver is Sikh. When I was born in Vancouver in 1955 it was almost entirely white (there were a few Chinese in Chinatown, but they were a very tiny minority). The demographics didn’t start to change until the mid seventies. I didn’t notice the change until my daughter was born in 1977. It was a great shock to discover that more than half the babies in the hospital nursery appeared to be East Indian. This was the old Grace Hospital. I remember my in laws being quite horrified by this. One morning they tried to give me an East Indian baby to feed. I had been lying in my front, and I have dark hair.

    It is quite startling to have your home town change so quickly and so drastically. It makes me more sympathetic to the native Indians.

    Reply

  3. Ideal immigrants from the perspective of a native elite, I’d say. Politics don’t interest them.

    Reply

  4. Quote from the site I just linked to:
    “When in doubt, the rule is to help your ethnic sisters and brothers. What is true and what isn’t has no significance when dealing with an “infidel”. “

    Reply

  5. @melykin – “I read on your blog a few days ago that people are stealing crops out of farmers’ fields at night in Richmond.”

    i remember that. as someone who lives in a rural area, i was horrified! what the h*ck are people supposed to do? sit out at night and guard their crops?!

    to be honest, i have a hard time believing that han chinese people would stoop so low. i started to wonder if these thieves are some hill-tribe “chinese” people or something like that. -?-

    @melykin – “It was a great shock to discover that more than half the babies in the hospital nursery appeared to be East Indian.”

    wow. in the ’70s already. =/

    @melykin – “It is quite startling to have your home town change so quickly and so drastically. It makes me more sympathetic to the native Indians.”

    yeah. just reading this week about the maya, and the spanish conquest must’ve really been a shocking experience, not least because of the epidemics that hit them. =/

    i’m always amazed when i see pc news articles saying something to the effect of “Science shows all Europeans are immigrants” (like they did over the recent genetic findings showing that there was prolly a replacement of the european population in the neolithic). it’s like they don’t get it: the fact that most europeans today are “immigrants” from the middle east means that SOMEBODY WAS REPLACED! duh.

    Reply

  6. @melykin – “‘When in doubt, the rule is to help your ethnic sisters and brothers. What is true and what isn’t has no significance when dealing with an “infidel”.'”

    not good. =/

    Reply

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