mexican-american iq

chuck (the occidentalist) looks at ron unz’s claim that mexican-american iqs have been increasing (rather dramatically) over the last thirty to forty years:

“The differences [between white and mexican/hispanic iqs] ranges from 0.35 SD (GSS) to 0.77 SD (TIMSS grade 8 science). The average of the differences comes out to 0.61 SD or, when averaging PISA, TIMSS, and PIRLS tests scores per year, per grade (e.g., PISA 2009 MAth + Reading), 0.59 SD. This is not largely different from the general intelligence difference reported by Roth et al. (2001), which is notable given what was said about Spearman’s hypothesis. On re-analysis, Ron Unz’s claim concerning the difference in the GSS sample was upheld; this claim, though, was contradicted by all other samples.

previously: ron unz and iq

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7 Comments

  1. But I think it’s pretty obvious from last century’s white rural southern IQ changes, as well as what we’re seeing in the rest of the developing world, that education and diet do make a difference. We debate just how much of a difference (I suspect 20 points). The issue is that the tide floats all boats. That means relative differences remain in the distribution once all are educated. The difference in the distributions remains constant.

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  2. I don’t entirely understand the wordsum point but wouldn’t tests like wordsum which normally correlate to IQ to an some extent be distorted by native language?

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  3. @g.w. – “I don’t entirely understand the wordsum point but wouldn’t tests like wordsum which normally correlate to IQ to an some extent be distorted by native language?”

    yeah, absolutely. but chuck looked at 3rd+ generation individuals, and not just @the gss wordsum stuff but other tests as well (thus his comment that other samples don’t support ron’s claim).

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  4. “but chuck looked at 3rd+ generation individuals”

    Ah, third generation. I know a lot of 1st generation immigrant families speak their own language at home so for their children being born in a country isn’t the same as being fully immersed in the new language. I guess 3rd+ generation would be a safe cut-off point for that effect (if any)?

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