linkfest – 07/22/12

a day late. sorry ’bout that!

Has Ron Unz Refuted “Hard Hereditarianism”? – nope. @vdare.

J. Philippe Rushton Says Color May Be More Than Skin Deep – also @vdare. see also Do pigmentation and the melanocortin system modulate aggression and sexuality in humans as they do in other animals? [opens pdf]

Neanderthals ate their greens“Tooth analysis shows that european hominins roasted vegetables and may have used medicinal plants.”

Cross-national correlates of corruption – from the inductivist.

Bounty mutineer descendants may hold key to myopia“Descendants of the famous Bounty mutineers who now live on an isolated Pacific Island have among the lowest rate of myopia in the world and may hold the key to unlocking the genetic code for the disease.”

bonus: History Resumes: Sectarianism’s Unlearned Lessons“[A]s Valli Nasr observed in an influential postmortem essay he wrote for Foreign Affairs in 2006, ‘The Bush administration thought of politics as the relationship between individuals and the state, and so it failed to recognize that people in the Middle East see politics also as the balance of power among communities.'”

bonus bonus: Evolution in a Jiffy

bonus bonus bonus: Newfound Monkey Flower Reveals Evolution in Action“A new species of monkey flower has been found in Scotland, the product of a tryst between two foreign flowers. But this is no ordinary love child. While almost all such hybrids are sterile — just as mules are sterile hybrids of donkeys and horses — a rare genetic duplication allowed this species to become fertile.”

bonus bonus bonus bonus: Medieval lingerie – fifteenth century “tuttensecks.”

bonus bonus bonus bonus bonus: Who Needs the Euro When You Can Pay With Deutsche Marks?“Germans hang on to old currency….”

bonus bonus bonus bonus bonus bonus: The Graph Of Ideas – graphing every idea in history. don’t miss: Philosophers of antiquity influencing 18th, 19th and 20th century philosophers.

edit: Preliminary notes on the possible sociobiological implications of the rural Chinese political economy [opens pdf]

(note: comments do not require an email. hi there!)

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10 Comments

  1. About Unz and his complete rubbish about IQ (rather ironic from a man with an IQ as purportedly high as his), I was going to write my own blog post debunking it, but Peter Frost has pretty much beat me to it, making most of the points I was going to make.

    The only other thing I was going to add is that most of the studies that Unz singles out as giving anomalously low average IQs were all done on children, when IQ is known to be unreliable.

    Reply

  2. @jayman – “About Unz and his complete rubbish about IQ (rather ironic from a man with an IQ as purportedly high as his)….”

    well, as ron, himself, once said (see edit in post above):

    “Sociobiological analysis is most easily applicable to those behaviors which are most fundamentally and powerfully linked to genetic fitness, i.e. those concerning reproduction and life-and-death decisions. These behaviors are also those which are innately linked to the strongest emotions, hence likely to be surrounded by the strongest cultural taboos blocking study.”

    thnx for the link to peter frost’s post. i hadn’t seen it!

    Reply

  3. A word about wordsum:

    Since wordsum is basically a vocabulary test, it doesn’t seem like it would necessarily have great validity when comparing certain subgroups. It seems like vocabulary is something that can be molded a lot by environment. In general, of course, folks with high intelligence will tend to have large vocabularies, but it doesn’t seem like it would necessarily give an accurate comparison for groups that differ heavily in their opportunities to acquire new vocabulary (urban vs. rural whites, for example). And if a particular group tends to skew towards higher or lower verbal intelligence, relative to other areas, then wordsum (which is pretty much all verbal) would tend to either overstate or understate the average intelligence of that group.

    Reply

  4. JayMan: The only other thing I was going to add is that most of the studies that Unz singles out as giving anomalously low average IQs were all done on children, when IQ is known to be unreliable

    Hmmm… Someone separately pointed out that the IQ studies done by Buj are widely seen as unreliable and should be discarded because they were all done in the European capital cities, and hence are hardly nationally representative, which seems a very fair point.

    But as it happens, Buj’s studies were the *only* European ones cited by Lynn that involved adults—every other IQ study was based on children. And you’re now arguing that all those children IQ studies be excluded.

    That leaves Lynn’s book with ZERO European IQ studies, and obviously renders his results totally consistent, since zero datapoints is consistent with anything and everything.

    [*redacted* – please refrain from making rude comments towards other commenters. thank you. hbd chick.]

    Reply

  5. Mr. Unz,

    Buj’s studies were the *only* European ones cited by Lynn that involved adults—every other IQ study was based on children. And you’re now arguing that all those children IQ studies be excluded.

    The problems in your analysis have already been pointed out to you quite adequately already elsewhere, so instead of going over all it again here, I’m to quickly address your points raised here.

    I am not saying that those results should be completely discarded. Rather, you need to take scores from individual studies for what they’re worth and take them with a grain of salt. The problems of variability have already been explained to you. I myself encountered the problem of somewhat contradictory scores when I was compiling data for my map of European average IQs.

    Even Lynn doesn’t take the scores as seriously as you seem to, because while precise scores would have been helpful, they were not necessary for the purposes of Lynn’s and Vanhanen’s analysis. Nonetheless, L&V’s scores have been corroborated many times over.

    I will add that in certain instances where Lynn did try to get highly IQ accurate IQ scores for certain regions, such as Italy and sub-Saharan Africa, he received a lot of flack.

    Reply

  6. re: China’s “Extreme Free Market” peasant land system

    Been reading a lot about China lately. Unz’s assumption (assertion) that the rural land market was generally laissez faire is mistaken. More often it was the reverse: land was owned conjointly by clans and lineages and was doled out each generation to sons by male elder or village head man. Selling it was not the norm, only happened under extreme circumstances (famine, for example). Also, historically, there were periodic redistributions of land, usually with coming of new dynasty, to rectify inequalities that had accumulated over the centuries as a result of war, imperial grants, etc. Mao did it when he first took over, though in that case they murdered the landlords and rich peasants and branded their children as class enemies. Recently read of a case in which a son was forced to bury his father alive to prove his loyalty to the Party.

    There were landlords of course, and land was bought and sold — it just wasn’t the norm. Unz is [*redacted* let’s keep the conversation civilized, please! thnx. h. chick].

    Reply

  7. the softpath is Luke Lea btw. Why does WordPress do this to me? Also you should probably ignore my ad hominem attack on Unz. He is so annoying.

    Reply

  8. JayMan “rather ironic from a man with an IQ as purportedly high as his”

    “Unz knows the value of a good attention-getter. Although he was working on a Ph.D. in theoretical physics, when Unz applied for his first summer job on Wall Street several years ago he was concerned about how his résumé would play, since he had no financial experience. So he inflated his IQ, listing it as 214 on the Stanford-Binet scale–way beyond genius range.”

    http://azbilingualed.org/AZ%20Hist-ALEC/can_ron_unz_be_trusted.htm

    Reply

  9. Part of Unz’s strategy is to refute Lynn instead of the position Lynn stands for. There’s a name for that approach. Hint: “With the thoughts you’ll be thinkin’ you could be another Lincoln If you only had a brain.”

    Reply

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