civicness in the u.s. by race

following up on civicness in the u.s. by region, here is civicness in the u.s. by race.

the data are taken from the world values survey, 2005-2008 wave (2006 for the u.s.). note that these are people who claim that they are active members of voluntary organizations. here’s what i found (click on chart for LARGER view):

so totally, whites are a bit above average while blacks are a bit below average. hispanics, otoh, are quite a bit below average. the “others” (asians?) are in the lead, but note that the sample size for that group is rather small (n=62). (note that i also left out the “mixed race” category ’cause the sample size was way too small [n=14]. i also skipped the “other organization” category, again because the sample sizes were too small.)

african americans, then, are like their distant cousins back in africa — very civic-minded, civic here meaning inclined to join together in voluntary associations.

white americans score above average in joining: political parties, sports/recreation organizations, charities/humanitarian organizations, art/music/educational organizations, professional organizations and environmental organizations.

black americans score above average in joining: church/religious organizations (average), art/music/educational organizations and labor unions. the church/religious organization really seems to have pulled their total average up.

hispanic americans score above average in joining: church/religious organizations and labor unions, pretty much like they do back home.

previously: civic societies and civic societies ii and civicness in the u.s. (by region)

(note: comments do not require an email. voluntary association.)

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2 Comments

  1. Labor unions seem like an iffy category for these polls. How often is it even a choice to join one? In states without “Right to Work” laws, if get employed in a union shop you must pay dues whether you are in the union or not–so of course there really is no choice.

    Reply

  2. @bleach – “In states without ‘Right to Work’ laws, if get employed in a union shop you must pay dues whether you are in the union or not–so of course there really is no choice.”

    good point.

    still, in the bigger picture — i mean, in comparing different societies — i think the category is still meaningful. it does say something about your society if labor unions are present or not.

    Reply

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