linkfest – 01/22/12

Penn Researchers Help Solve Questions About Ethiopians’ High-Altitude Adaptations“[A]ll three groups’ [andeans, tibetans, amharans] adaptations appear to involve different genetic mutations, an example of convergent evolution.”

Yeast suggests speedy start for multicellular life“Single-celled organism can evolve multicellularity within months.” – whoa.

‘Rules’ may govern genome evolution in young plant species“Scientists have often wondered if there are ‘rules’ that govern patterns of evolution, and data for Tragopogon polyploids suggest that such rules may actually operate at the genetic level.”

IQ Ceilings? – from jayman.

When it Comes to Accepting Evolution, Gut Feelings Trump Facts – and religious belief – “[I]ntuitive cognition has a significant impact on what people end up accepting, no matter how much they know…. [E]ven students with greater knowledge of evolutionary facts weren’t likelier to accept the theory, unless they also had a strong ‘gut’ feeling about those facts…. For the subjects of this study, belonging to a religion had almost no additional impact on beliefs about evolution….”

Race and self-enhancement – from the inductivist.

Do smart people lie more? – the inductivist, on a roll this week!

Gossip isn’t all bad — new study finds its social and psychological benefits – most importantly, it makes you feel better. (~_^)

Do some cultures have their own ways of going mad? – via amren.

Into the mind of a Neanderthal

bonus: Data suggests people using pseudonyms leave better comments – pseudonyms rock!

(note: comments do not require an email. some ethiopian highlanders.)

9 Comments

  1. Re: Pseudonyms
    Not surprising. Smart people know that they should keep their privacy on the Internet.
    It’s also related to age: I remember back in the 90’s it was considered rather odd to use your real name in casual conversations on the Internet. And of course it was early adopters who used the Internet then, a selected group with a higher IQ (many who’d migrated over from BBSes where using your real name was even weirder)

    By the way, hbdchick, I can tell from certain jargon that you use, that you were probably already heavily into the Internet in the mid-to-late 90’s. Am I correct? :)

    Reply

  2. @ihtg – “By the way, hbdchick, I can tell from certain jargon that you use, that you were probably already heavily into the Internet in the mid-to-late 90′s. Am I correct? :)”

    you should never ask a woman her age! even indirectly. (~_^)

    all i will say, tho, is — aaah. bbses. them were the good ol’ days. (^_^)

    Reply

  3. Yeast suggests speedy start for multicellular life – “Single-celled organism can evolve multicellularity within months.” – whoa.

    Most of the time when growing up there was either live yogurt or sour-dough bread starter in a crock on the kitchen counter in my mom’s and grandmother’s kitchens. Thank god we always left the lids on, else I probably would have suffered some tragic Blob-like science fiction death as a youth.

    Reply

  4. @rjp – “Thank god we always left the lids on, else I probably would have suffered some tragic Blob-like science fiction death as a youth.”

    (^_^) (^_^) (^_^)

    (hmmm. i should go check the yeast i’ve got in the kitchen … but now i’m afraid.)

    Reply

  5. “I remember back in the 90′s it was considered rather odd to use your real name in casual conversations on the Internet.”

    Back when newsgroups served the role that blogs and discussion forums have today, that is, in the 1980s and 1990s, I think most people used their real names in discussions. I wasn’t around then, but it is said the quality of discussions on the Internet was much higher in those days, because most participants were students or faculty at good universities (because very few regular people had access to the Internet).

    Reply

  6. It’s audience selection. When the audience was all university students and professors, the discussions were characteristic of discussions in universities.

    Now, it’s much more democratic. Odd how many seem to resent this.

    Reply

  7. True enough, there’s also the academic community on the Internet that has been there since the beginning. That’s a different breed than the early adopter geeks who jumped from BBSes to the ‘Net in the mid-90’s, and I wouldn’t consider their newsgroups to be ‘casual’.

    Reply

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