il fascismo

i’ve shamelessly lifted the map below from m.g. miles who found it in emmanuel todd’s, “L’invention de l’Europe”:

my question is, what the h*ck is fascism? something to do with:

a) being germanic
b) having a high average iq
c) being a “corporate” society (during hard times)
d) all of the above
e) none of the above

(note: comments do not require an email. fascist cat.)

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12 Comments

  1. George Orwell wrote my favorite definition of fascism to date: “Many political words are similarly abused. The word Fascism has now no meaning except in so far as it signifies ‘something not desirable’.”

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  2. Benito Mussolini said Fascism was the union of the government and corporations. Sounds like the USA, doesn’t it?

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  3. Re: Italy’s particuliar type of corporatism, Giuseppe Micheli says “On the one hand the predisposition of sibs to ‘embark on common entrepreneurial initiatives’, typical of the stem-family, takes the shape of the ‘family-firm’ in Central-Northern Italy industrial districts; on the other the importance of blood-ties in stem-family areas is the incubator of the ethnocentric philosophy of ‘little homelands’.” [Those ‘stem-family’ areas cover northern Spain, most of Germany and part of northern Italy.]

    What I also found odd about that map is that pretty much this same region of Italy also voted the most strongly communist in 1975!

    Incidentally, Todd’s Germany electoral maps from 1932 show an almost perfect correlation between Protestantism + more votes for the Nazi Party. The Catholic regions less so. Then in Spain he shows the very-Catholic north (also stem-family) siding hugely with the nationalists during the Civil War.

    Don’t know what it all means, but Todd is convinced it’s all family-structure-related. No doubt there’s many different factors at work.

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  4. @occupant – thnx! i was using a slightly different definition of the word “corporate” here, referring more to a societal form wherein the members act as independent individuals who join up together in “corporate” groups to foster some end — like guilds or a neighborhood watch. as opposed to, say, a tribal society. business corporations arose in our (western) corporate society for obvious reasons.

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  5. @m.g. – “What I also found odd about that map is that pretty much this same region of Italy also voted the most strongly communist in 1975!”

    yeah, interesting, huh?! i wonder if the connection here is that both fascism and communism, considered from the point-of-view of the man-on-the-street (i.e. not the leaders), are thought of as ideological movements that will directly benefit the working man. they are — or can be — both “populist” movements of a sort. dunno. just thinking aloud.

    @m.g. – “Don’t know what it all means, but Todd is convinced it’s all family-structure-related. No doubt there’s many different factors at work.”

    i still very much think he is on to something with the family-structures. i have them in mind all the time whenever i’m reading about different societies. what i think, though, is that his family-structures and (my) mating patterns are related (he has his favorite pet theory, and i have mine (~_^) ). what i mean is, i think in the areas where you have the most outbreeding (england being the prime example), then you get the independent nuclear family. in areas where you have a lot of inbreeding, well there you get the extreme extended families (arab societies). in areas where you have moderate amounts of inbreeding, you get something in between: stem families.

    all of this is tied into — and cannot be divorced from — economic circumstances (i.e. the environment). and all three — mating patterns, family systems and economic circumstances — all feed back into each other. outbreed a lot and you might be able to have relatively independent nuclear families … if the economic circumstances are right. on the other hand, if you have an economic system dependent upon stem families, you might wind up sorta stuck with your economic system … and a certain mating pattern. and so on, and so on.

    in other words, it’s complicated! (^_^)

    thnx for the reference (on your blog) to putnam and his work in italy. i’m in the middle of reading his book on all that — very interesting! (^_^)

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  6. @eugenicist – you know, for the longest time i thought that you were using a photo of yourself as your avatar. *faceplam*

    i obviously need new reading glasses. (^_^)

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  7. General Patton’s U.S. Army revivified the Mafia in Sicily, which had been driven underground by Mussolini. The American Army needed somebody indigenous to keep order as it rolled north, so it employed American Sicilians to contact their friends and their friends of friends, men of respect, to take charge.

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  8. Not only is there a similar area for Fascist sympathy in 1922 and 1975 (i.e. the area centered on Emilia-Romagnia and Tuscany), but you can see that the percent of the vote for the socialists in 1921 by the first Emmanuel Todd map also includes those two provinces. Obviously, the correlation isn’t perfect–fascists find relatively greater support in Trentino and Istria, while socialists did better in the other far north provinces. However, given the lack of support for either in the south, it’s pretty clear that both movements were northern phenomena.

    Not only were socialism, fascism, and communism more popular in the north, so was republicanism as opposed to monarchy, which was favored in the south during the 1946 referendum that lead to the start of the Italian Republic and the end of the Monarchy as can be seen in this map. I think that this pattern is illustrative of the fact that during the French Revolution, which gave us the the terminology of Left and Right, both groups were revolutionaries against the Ancien Régime and that if you want to conceptualize politics spacially, it’s probably best to include more than one dimension in your analysis. The bipolar Left-Right line of thought in the U.S. is reinforced by our voting system (single member district plurality for Congress and a bizarrely modified form of it for the Presidency), which by its nature produces two stable political parties, but it’s a pretty oversimplified view of the space of political possibilities.

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  9. @steve sailer – “The American Army needed somebody indigenous to keep order as it rolled north, so it employed American Sicilians to contact their friends and their friends of friends, men of respect, to take charge.”

    this is the side of military types that i can really appreciate — the “get things done” side. maybe it kinda s*cked that the u.s. forces revived the mafia in sicily — or maybe the sicilians were glad to have it back, i dunno — but i still very much like the preference for reality in most military people. goal-oriented. i like that!

    despite the fact that they’re supposed to be “bringing democracy” to iraq or afghanistan or wherever, the u.s. military has very much worked with the tribes and the tribal structures in those countries. (some of the best anthropological work on tribes in the middle east/south asia that i’ve seen comes from the military.) what else are they supposed to do? pretend that the tribes don’t exist and run things as though they were in the u.s. or europe? they wouldn’t achieve much then.

    it worries me, therefore, when i read all this political correct/diversity nonsense coming out of the military. i really hope they’re just paying lip-service to it all.

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  10. during the French Revolution, which gave us the the terminology of Left and Right, both groups were revolutionaries against the Ancien Régime

    Indeed, I think it’s tough for us today to climb into that mentality, where even limited-suffrage Republicanism was seen by many as completely radical, let alone the Proletarianism that Marx/Engels and many others were promoting already in the mid-1800s. Perhaps for the old-school monarchist, both Republicanism and Socialism are just two different flavors of the same madness.

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