carrots

since even plants are more altruistic to other individual plants most closely related to themselves (i.e. more so to their brother and sister plants, i suppose, than to their cousins or to strangers), dropping down fewer roots when they are neighbors to close relatives, oughtn’t i then make sure to plant unrelated carrots next to one another in a row in order to maximize the root size? (not to mention my rutabaga, turnips, and parsnips!)

inclusive fitness — essential for even the home gardener to understand?

(^_^)

previously: even plants do it!

(note: comments do not require an email. carrots are good for you!)

14 Comments

  1. carrot, radish, turnip, beet, daikon, carrot, radish, turnip, beet, daikon.

    Think of our yields …… Plump flavorful organic root crops that would make SWPL peoples salivate out of an open mouth for while simultaneously being over-charged for them at the farmers market.

    Reply

  2. @rjp – “…while simultaneously being over-charged for them at the farmers market.”

    (*hbd chick rubs palms together*) bwa-ha-ha-ha-ha-ha! (<< diabolical laughter.)

    (^_^)

    Reply

  3. “oughtn’t i then make sure to plant unrelated carrots next to one another in a row in order to maximize the root size?”

    Maybe if you were growing for a size competition i.e. biggest marrow. The unrelated marrows would compete and the winner might end up being bigger as a result (at the expense of all the others). However if they’re doing it to gain an overall benefit in terms of total biomass i’d have thought planting cooperating family carrots would give you the largest yield i.e. a choice between getting one big carrot and lots of stunted ones or a larger total mass of similar sized carrots.

    Reply

  4. So do carrots also do ‘me and my brother against my cousin’?
    cousin cross-fertilizing? Somebody should try

    Reply

  5. @g.w. – “i’d have thought planting cooperating family carrots would give you the largest yield i.e. a choice between getting one big carrot and lots of stunted ones or a larger total mass of similar sized carrots.”

    yes, that is the question! guess i’m gonna have to run some eg-speriments. (^_^) i’m after the largest, total yield, of course — not just one blue-ribbon winner.

    maybe rjp’s solution would be a good idea: “carrot, radish, turnip, beet, daikon, carrot, radish, turnip, beet, daikon.”

    dunno. ??

    heh. new discipline: applied inclusive fitness. (~_^)

    Reply

  6. “heh. new discipline: applied inclusive fitness”

    all joking aside this could turn out to be spectacularly important in terms of seed horticulture and farming output.

    i’m imagining a potential 10% increase in crop yield from working with the grain of nature on this and feeling how unlikely it sounds. it doesn’t feel that unlikely.

    Reply

  7. @g.w. – “all joking aside this could turn out to be spectacularly important in terms of seed horticulture and farming output.”

    yes, indeed. i’m only half-joking, too, just ’cause it is funny to think about meercarrots. (~_^)

    but, like you say, what if it did increase yields in a significant way?? even beyond what fertilizing and pesticides gets you.

    might be a h*ckuva lot of work to sort some of these seeds along familial lines, tho. don’t know how cost effective it would be — unless someone could come up with a very efficient solution. it might be more easily applied to larger plants like fruit trees and such.

    i’ve come across a couple of plant-related kin-selection (inclusive fitness) articles like this. i wonder if the researchers are contemplating applications related to agriculture or not? i’ll have to go back to the original articles to see what they have to say.

    Reply

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