holier than thou

in a comment over @the one’s blog, saige pointed this out:

“Just under two years ago, my wife and I adopted a little girl. 3 days ago, we adopted her biological sibling.”

if anybody had any doubts at all about steve sailer’s idea that it’s whites vs. whites in a moral status game (ironically and amusingly using other peoples as pawns), just read some of the props that this guy and his (presumably also white) wife are getting:

“Bravo! You and your wife are true heroes. And your children are beautiful.”
“This is the way to have kids. Take care of someone who is not taken care of already. + millions of points for doing the right thing!”
“Adopting a child noteworthy, adopting her siblings, priceless.”
“You are a hero. More people should do this.”
“*stands and claps*”
“You, sir, are truly something special. Your wife too. Congratulations!”
“You are an amazing human being. This exemplifies everything someone should strive to be. Thank you for making a difference, good sir. <3", etc., etc.

morality WIN!

how can i be so heartless and uncaring about such a heart-warming story, you ask? ’cause i’m heartless and uncaring, remember?! (~_^)

(note: comments do not require an email. swpl – diversity!)

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14 Comments

  1. @r.a. – “Everyone is a pawn in someone else’s game of chess.”

    goodness. and i thought i was cynical.

    the funny thing about the holier-than-thou people of the world, tho, is that they don’t think/realize that they themselves take part in such reindeer games. or at least they tend to portray themselves as innocents.

    Reply

  2. @the slitty eye – “As long as their kids don’t grow up being a thug on the street…”

    i know a couple who adopted two romanian orphans back in the early ’90s when there was all that scandal about romanian orphans from the ceausescu days. they turned out to be absolute nightmares — behavioral problems that you would just not believe. they had a boy and a girl — the boy was pretty bad, but generally just did some rather bad boy kinda stuff (keyed his father’s mercedes at age 11) — but the girl was just scary. scary like in an exorcist chick kinda way. i’d be afraid to leave the kitchen knives unlocked while i slept with her in the house. and i’m talking about when she was five!

    they never said it to me (’cause i didn’t know them that well — they were sorta in-laws), but from what i heard, i think they always regretted their decision. it was just one thing after another.

    i’m not saying that adoption is a bad thing — but, boy — you need to choose wisely.

    Reply

  3. @hbd chick
    That sounds like a extremely awful story. sounds like a film script to me. lol… You sure those so-called Romanian orphans ain’t no Gypsy? Tons of them everywhere in Romania…

    Reply

  4. @the slitty eye – “You sure those so-called Romanian orphans ain’t no Gypsy?”

    yes. i have wondered about that, too, ’cause i think a lot of those kids from romanian orphanges actually did turn out to be gypsies. good chances that the (scary) little girl from my story was a gypsy — she was dark with dark hair and dark eyes. very “exotic” looking. the boy was blonde and fair, so don’t know about him.

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  5. Speaking of gypsies in Rumania, the image of Borat flashes back in my mind. did you know that in the movie, Borat’s hometown was actually filmed in a gypsy village in Romania… With lots of friends from Eastern Europe, I’ve heard so many stories about them, and personally saw them stealing light pole on the street in daytime once in Brno, Czech. I know Americans are probably a bit clueless about them, in Eastern Europe their status is like an eternal curse… I am sure they inbreed a lot, I would even be surprised if they practice incest in a large scale….

    Reply

  6. @the slitty eye – “I am sure they inbreed a lot, I would even be surprised if they practice incest in a large scale….”

    yeah, i’ve seen some numbers in passing of gypsy inbreeding — like you say, lots of inbreeding. here’s some figures for slovak roma [pg. 10]: 10%-14% first-cousin (and double-first-cousin) marriages.

    and look at those irish travellers you were talking about! [pg. 11]: 65.5%-71.6% first- and second-cousin marriages. whoa.

    hey — are there any gypsy-like groups in china? i’ve never heard of any, but then what do i know? (~_^)

    Reply

  7. WOW~ No wonder Irish travelers are all good bare-knuckle fighters, too much inbreeding make people retarded…lol

    gypsy-like groups in China…. hmm… Chinese society in China proper has always been quite static and homogeneous…. Most Chinese are peasants that are bond to lands, I would say the Hui Muslims are the one that travel from place to place the most in China.

    Meanwhile, there’s also an interesting Chinese subgroup called Hakka people. They are basically Chinese who fled from nomadic invasion to Southeastern China, they travel a lot, but mostly do business and etc. (together with cantonese they are the ancestors of most oversea Chinese in Southeast Asia, Europe and America).

    Old China demographics are much clearer than that of Europe. Nomads usually quickly went upscale becoming a noble or assimilating into land bond farmers, few could retain their pre-sinic rules in China proper (even the Kaifeng Jews have been completely assimilated).

    Interestingly, gypsies were once in China too. They were brought by the Mongols. We used to called them 罗哩回回 (Luoli Hui Hui) as it associates with Hui Muslims. They were quite notorious in history, literally professional thugs in Chinese villages and towns. But after Ming dynasty after 14th century they seemed to blend in eventually as well, either Hui or Han Chinese. Or probably obliterated together with those Muslim rebels in Ming and Qing era from 14th to 19th century.

    Reply

  8. hbd chick:

    goodness. and i thought i was cynical.

    Perhaps it’s a bit cynical, but I think that it’s an interesting way of looking at interactions. Everyone is a motivated agent facing a landscape of differently (and often orthogonally) motivated agents and in order to satisfy motivations the motivations of others, everyone is in some sense “used as a pawn” by someone else, regardless of their rank or station in life.

    slitty eye:

    Interestingly, gypsies were once in China too. They were brought by the Mongols. We used to called them 罗哩回回 (Luoli Hui Hui) as it associates with Hui Muslims.

    I did a quick Google search on them and found the following interesting tidbits:
    A much better than average Yahoo answer about them
    A Google Books result from a 2008 history book
    A Google Books result from a 2010 which has curiously similar wording to that of the 2008 book in the passage concerning this topic
    To be fair, the two books are from the same publisher and possibly part of a related series, but I thought it was funny nonetheless.

    Reply

  9. @the slitty eye – so, no gypsy-like groups in china then. that’s what i kinda thought ’cause i’ve never heard of anything like gypsies in china (you think people woulda talked about them at least occasionally in reference to gypsies and travellers, etc.). thnx!

    @the slitty eye – “[T]here’s also an interesting Chinese subgroup called Hakka people.”

    oh, yeah! i’ve heard of the hakka. they’re the ones with those HUGE clan houses. cool!

    Reply

  10. @r.a. – “Everyone is a motivated agent facing a landscape of differently (and often orthogonally) motivated agents and in order to satisfy motivations the motivations of others, everyone is in some sense ‘used as a pawn’ by someone else, regardless of their rank or station in life.”

    very true, i think. it’s just not a very Romantic way of viewing humanity. not that there’s anything wrong with that. (~_^)

    Reply

  11. very true, i think. it’s just not a very Romantic way of viewing humanity. not that there’s anything wrong with that. (~_^)

    Loss of Romanticism is probably part of the reason that I’m a reluctant apostate (as opposed to not an apostate at all). That said, one doesn’t have to take a Romantic view of humanity to value it highly.

    Reply

  12. “everyone is in some sense ‘used as a pawn’ by someone else”

    True. Still it was way worse before the industrial revolution occured, before we had all the power machinery we have now to do the work slaves and serfs used to do. If you analyze any medieval society in Europe, for instance, you will see that almost everyone was both exploiting and being exploited by someone else. The only exceptions were the king at the very top of the heap and the peasant women and children at the bottom — and I’m not sure about all the women!

    Reply

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