north vs. south

steve sailer mentions that in the latest PISA scores, “Northern Italians outscore Sicilians.”

yes. yes, they do. [link opens a spreadsheet.]

from table S.I.c. on that spreadsheet – “Mean score, variation and gender differences in student performance on the reading scale”:

448 – Italy (Provincia Calabria) – on the “toe” of italy
451 – Italy (Provincia Campania) – southern italy
453 – Italy (Provincia Sicilia) – sicily
469 – Italy (Provincia Sardegna) – sardinia
471 – Italy (Provincia Molise) – southern italy
473 – Italy (Provincia Basilicata) – southern italy
480 – Italy (Provincia Abruzzo) – central italy
481 – Italy (Provincia Lazio) – central italy
489 – Italy (Provincia Puglia) – the “heel” of the boot
490 – Italy (Provincia Autonoma of Bolzano) – northern italy – 73% speak italian, 26% speak german – heavily settled by italians during the “italianization programme” of the 1920s. sorry. that was about the city of bolzano, not the province which is still majority german speaking.
490 – Italy (Provincia Umbria) – central italy
491 – Italy (Provincia Liguria) – northern italy
493 – Italy (Provincia Toscana) – central italy
496 – Italy (Provincia Piemonte) – northern italy
499 – Italy (Provincia Marche) – central italy
502 – Italy (Provincia Emilia Romagna) – northern italy
505 – Italy (Provincia Veneto) – northern italy
508 – Italy (Provincia Trento) – northern italy
513 – Italy (Provincia Friuli Venezia Giulia) – northern italy
514 – Italy (Provincia Valle d’Aosta) – northern italy
522 – Italy (Provincia Lombardia) – named, of course, after the lombards, the bunch o’ germans who settled there once upon a time.

back to you, dennis!

update 12/11: from table S.I.u. on that spreadsheet – “Mean score, variation and gender differences in student performance on the mathematics scale”:

442 – Italy (Provincia Calabria) – on the “toe” of italy
447 – Italy (Provincia Campania) – southern italy
450 – Italy (Provincia Sicilia) – sicily
456 – Italy (Provincia Sardegna) – sardinia
467 – Italy (Provincia Molise) – southern italy
473 – Italy (Provincia Lazio) – central italy
474 – Italy (Provincia Basilicata) – southern italy
476 – Italy (Provincia Abruzzo) – central italy
486 – Italy (Provincia Umbria) – central italy
488 – Italy (Provincia Puglia) – the “heel” of the boot
491 – Italy (Provincia Liguria) – northern italy
493 – Italy (Provincia Toscana) – central italy
493 – Italy (Provincia Piemonte) – northern italy
499 – Italy (Provincia Marche) – central italy
502 – Italy (Provincia Valle d’Aosta) – northern italy
503 – Italy (Provincia Emilia Romagna) – northern italy
507 – Italy (Provincia Autonoma of Bolzano) – northern italy
508 – Italy (Provincia Veneto) – northern italy
510 – Italy (Provincia Friuli Venezia Giulia) – northern italy
514 – Italy (Provincia Trento) – northern italy
516 – Italy (Provincia Lombardia) – named, of course, after the lombards, the bunch o’ germans who settled there once upon a time.

from table S.I.x. on that spreadsheet – “Mean score, variation and gender differences in student performance on the science scale”:

443 – Italy (Provincia Calabria) – on the “toe” of italy
446 – Italy (Provincia Campania) – southern italy
451 – Italy (Provincia Sicilia) – sicily
466 – Italy (Provincia Basilicata) – southern italy
469 – Italy (Provincia Molise) – southern italy
474 – Italy (Provincia Sardegna) – sardinia
480 – Italy (Provincia Abruzzo) – central italy
482 – Italy (Provincia Lazio) – central italy
490 – Italy (Provincia Puglia) – the “heel” of the boot
497 – Italy (Provincia Umbria) – central italy
498 – Italy (Provincia Liguria) – northern italy
500 – Italy (Provincia Toscana) – central italy
501 – Italy (Provincia Piemonte) – northern italy
504 – Italy (Provincia Marche) – central italy
508 – Italy (Provincia Emilia Romagna) – northern italy
513 – Italy (Provincia Autonoma of Bolzano) – northern italy
518 – Italy (Provincia Veneto) – northern italy
521 – Italy (Provincia Valle d’Aosta) – northern italy
523 – Italy (Provincia Trento) – northern italy
524 – Italy (Provincia Friuli Venezia Giulia) – northern italy
526 – Italy (Provincia Lombardia) – named, of course, after the lombards, the bunch o’ germans who settled there once upon a time.

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3 Comments

  1. I have always been surprised at the intensity of the North-South Italy debates. Why no East-West France debates or Northwest-Southeast Sweden debates?
    :)
    I guess there are one-country two-region scuffles in a lot of countries, but the Italy thing seems particularly salient in the Steveosphere.

    Reply

  2. @b lode – “I have always been surprised at the intensity of the North-South Italy debates.”

    well, u know how italians are. so tempermental! (~_^) gotta luv ’em!

    Reply

  3. “Working with data from the PISA study (OECD, 2007), Lynn (2010) has argued that individuals from South Italy average an IQ approximately 10 points lower than individuals from North Italy, and has gone on to put forward a series of conclusions on the relationship between average IQ, latitude, average stature, income, etc. The present paper criticizes these conclusions and the robustness of the data from which Lynn (2010) derived the IQ scores. In particular, on the basis of recent Italian studies and our databank, we observe that : 1) school measures should be used for deriving IQ indices only in cases where contextual variables are not crucial: there is evidence that partialling out the role of contextual variables may lead to reduction or even elimination of PISA differences; in particular, schooling effects are shown through different sets of data obtained for younger grades; 2) in the case of South Italy, the PISA data may have exaggerated the differences, since data obtained with tasks similar to the PISA tasks (MT-advanced) show smaller differences; 3) national official data, obtained by INVALSI (2009a) on large numbers of primary school children, support these conclusions, suggesting that schooling may have a critical role; 4) purer measures of IQ obtained during the standardisation of Raven’s Progressive Coloured Matrices also show no significant differences in IQ between children from South and North Italy.”

    http://italianthro.blogspot.com/2010/10/richard-lynn-further-refuted.html

    Reply

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